How do you write a character description

Could be described as a counter POV shot.

How do you write a character description

Screenwriting Terms & Filmmaking Terminology

We have the unfortunate tendency to only write one type of character or to write characters as stereotypes. However, writing your characters in this way does not make for a great read.

Here are some ways that you can improve your female characters and make them complex and rich: Females are not always the mother type, weak, emotional or so on like stereotypes would have you think.

Also, in contrast, males are not always strong, brave, or stupid. People are complex and they can have a variety of reactions. Instead of making it all about your character being female, try to come up with a character without thinking about gender first. Then once you have the character in mind you can assign genders.

She might be able to bench two hundred pounds and she might cry at the drop of a hat. What is important is that her gender is secondary to her characterization.

Even if it will not feature in your writing at all, having a back story for your character in mind helps to make them deeper or richer.

Because you know her background you can keep the reactions consistent and give your readers indications of her background without having to really go into it. Just as long as you know what it is first!

These glimpses into a hidden background make the reader long for more and also help the reader to connect to the character in a real visceral way.

Everyone is motivated by something. Love, money, power, loss, pain, redemption and so on are common motivations in writing. Motivations determine a lot about how a character reacts and what their long term goals are.

A woman concerned with money over love will be more likely to manipulate others for her own gain, for example. However a character that grows throughout the story can change motivations as well. Perhaps she started out as a lover and was hurt so that now she values power or control, or vice versa.

how do you write a character description

Motivations can be a powerful way to move your plot along as well. Plots depend on action and motivation begets action. An introvert is less likely to seek social interaction than an extrovert, for example. A thinker is more likely to find a logical solution where a feeler will go with her guts.

However you should not pick a personality type you are not comfortable with. If you are an introvert and she is one too, how would you feel walking into a crowded room? If she is an extrovert then what would you imagine would be the opposite of what you would feel? Or, in contrast, what would you like to feel?

how do you write a character description

You are a complex character yourself, so using your own thinking and reactions is perfectly valid. Complex characters allow us to explore sides of ourselves that we never imagined. By creating another individual out of your own imagination and understanding you can open your eyes to new ways of thinking or better appreciate why you do and feel the things you do.

Superhero Writing Advice

Creating a complex character is the same: The point is to make them real people that your readers can connect with.Use this reader's response activity to analyze the characters in any book. Print and collect your scrapbook pages.

Apr 04,  · Most of us learn the ABCs in our youth. We see and say the letters so many times they eventually become etched in our minds.

But researchers from Johns Hopkins University discovered that . Now — to establish storytelling authority — make sure the description is told from the proper subjective viewpoint: tell us how the character or narrator would see things from the POV you've established.

I provide advice about how to write novels, comic books and graphic torosgazete.com of my content applies to fiction-writing in general, but I also provide articles specifically about superhero stories.. This questionnaire will help you design a superhero or supervillain for a novel or comic book.

If you print or download from this site, please consider making at least a $ donation through PayPal. Sandra Effinger [email protected] DropBox Access -- Binder from summer workshops ( pages), various lists and handouts housed on my r etired AP English page have been migrated.

An invitation will be issued to $ donors. Narrative point of view. Narrative point of view or narrative perspective describes the position of the narrator, that is, the character of the storyteller, in relation to the story being told. It can be thought of as a camera mounted on the narrator's shoulder that can also look back inside the narrator's mind.

Sep 04,  · To write a descriptive paragraph, start by introducing the person, place, or thing you want to describe in the first sentence so you grab the reader's attention. Then, use vivid adjectives to describe what's happening to the reader, which will help them visualize everything%(8). Narrative point of view. Narrative point of view or narrative perspective describes the position of the narrator, that is, the character of the storyteller, in relation to the story being told. It can be thought of as a camera mounted on the narrator's shoulder that can also look back inside the narrator's mind. thoughts on “ 11 Secrets to Writing an Effective Character Description ” EddieTheWriter May 28, at am. Hey guys! This was a very useful article, wish I had come across this when I was writing a story. Instead, I went and made an app that helps create character descriptions modeled after successful TV show and movie characters.
5 Ways To Write A Complex Female Character - Bang2Write